Grant for special project on conscientious objectors in Lancashire during WWI

British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place as a campaign has been launched to win recognition for hundreds of First World War soldiers almost a century after they died at sea.
British soldier paying his respects at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles, where the Gallipoli landings took place as a campaign has been launched to win recognition for hundreds of First World War soldiers almost a century after they died at sea.

A project researching Lancashire’s wartime conscientious objectors has been awarded a £10,000 grant.

The Global Link development education centre in Lancaster was given the cash boost from the Heritage Lottery Fund’s First World War Then and Now programme.

The project was set up to mark the First World War’s centenary by researching the stories of local people who objected to the conflict.

The stories will be shared through a lecture series, a touring poster exhibition and a website.

Gisela Renolds, centre manager, said: “Volunteers in our current Documenting Dissent project found that there is a history of conscientious objection that hasn’t been told and felt that the centenary should also remember those who objected to the war.”

Education worker Alison Lloyd Williams said: “We are delighted to have received the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund for this project. If anyone would like to get involved as a volunteer, researching and documenting the stories of conscientious objectors please contact info@globallink.org.uk.

“Or if you have photos, objects or memories of conscientious objectors among your family and friends, get in touch, so we can share and celebrate these stories as well.”

Heritage Lottery Fund’s, Ivor Crowther, said: “With our new small grants programme, we are enabling even more communities like those involved in ‘Conscientious Objectors in Lancashire’ to explore the continuing legacy of this conflict and help young people to broaden their understanding of how it has shaped our modern world.”