Help little Luke to save centre

PHOTO. KEVIN McGUINNESS.'Garstang firefighters are pitching in to help Luke's appeal with a special charity car wash event on March 17. Watch Manager Jack Horner (2nd left) and the Garstang Fire Crew are pictured with Marie Carter with her sons Josh (6) and Luke (3)

PHOTO. KEVIN McGUINNESS.'Garstang firefighters are pitching in to help Luke's appeal with a special charity car wash event on March 17. Watch Manager Jack Horner (2nd left) and the Garstang Fire Crew are pictured with Marie Carter with her sons Josh (6) and Luke (3)

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THE parents of a three-year-old boy with celebral palsy have been tasked with a fund-raising mission to help save the centre where he goes for treatment.

Luke Carter, from Garstang, was born with the condition, leaving him struggling to walk and stand.

He, along with dozens of other youngsters, has been receiving specialist treatment at The Legacy Rainbow House in Omskirk, but that might have to stop because the centre is experiencing a funding crisis.

Luke’s mother and father, Marie and Dave Carter, are now trying to raise £3,000 so that he can continue receiving care. The couple, who also have a six-year old son Joshua, have joined forces with Garstang firefighters, who have organised a charity car wash on March 17 at the fire station on Green Lane West.

It is the first of a series of fundraising events the family hope to plan to help the charity’s appeal.

Marie said: “The Legacy Rainbow House has been such a massive support for us over the past six months.

“It is difficult bringing up a child with a disability, and there are very few of these specialist places in the north west offering this treatment

“We need to raise this money, not just for Luke, but for all the other children who attend and need to attend in the future.”

Luke, who will start primary school in September, was born 12 weeks premature weighing just 2lbs 11ounces but it was only when he was a month old he was diagnosed with celebral palsy.

Marie said: “We were just so grateful he had survived we didn’t really think about the diagnosis and what it meant.

“We knew nothing about the condition and how it would affect Luke but we found he wasn’t very mobile and he has problems with his balance.

“But since starting at Rainbow House he has made so much progress, he is a lot stronger and has taken his first few steps with a walking frame.”

Luke currently visits Rainbow House once a week for Conductive Education, which involves one on one physiotherapy to help Luke with physical activities including his walking.

The Legacy Rainbow House, founded in 2001 by a parent, specialises in providing a range of services for children with life limiting conditions and is the only centre in the north of England to offer such a variety of facilities.

Watch manager at the station Jack Horner said on hearing the family’s plight they were keen to support with their fundraising.

He said: “We do get involved with different organisations for fundraising and as soon as we were approached were happy to help.

“Garstang is a community station and part of the job is in helping the community as much as we can.”

The station will be open to all on Saturday March 17 for car washing services for a donation between 9am - 3pm.

Donations can also be pledged at Luke’s JustGiving page www.justgiving.com/marie-carter81