Village defibrillator could save lives

From the left: Margaret Catterall, James Wight, Judith Meredith, Dorothy Bretherton and  Phil Ackroyd
From the left: Margaret Catterall, James Wight, Judith Meredith, Dorothy Bretherton and Phil Ackroyd

Despite every effort and endeavour by ambulance paramedics, some emergency calls can take more than 10 minutes to arrive at an incident, particularly in rural areas. These communities and villages are at greater risk when cardiac arrest occurs.

With this thought in mind, all at Whitechapel Primary School and village hall joined together to spearhead a campaign to raise enough funds to install an Automated External Defibrillator (AED), which can improve survival rate should someone suffer cardiac arrest.

We hope we will never need to use our AED but it’s good to know it’s there should an emergency arise

Spokesman

The whole community rallied round raising funds. The school held a non-uniform day, the toddler group a sponsored ‘Toddle Waddle’ and there have been generous donations from individuals, local organisations and firms as well as a Local Members’ Grant obtained via Coun George Wilkins, resulting in more than £1,300 being raised.

The AED is now in place at the front entrance of the village hall and more than 60 people have attended training sessions to familiarise themselves with the equipment and its use.

A spokesperson said: “We hope we will never need to use our AED but it’s good to know it’s there should an emergency arise. Our thanks go to everyone who donated and organised events to make this possible.”

If a cardiac arrest victim is shocked with an AED within the first minute of collapse, the chance of survival is close to 90%, but if not until 10 minutes after collapse, the chances of survival are close to zero.