An Ascot play given a northern twist

Entertainment news from the Lancashire Evening Post
Entertainment news from the Lancashire Evening Post

Ladies Day

Royal Court Liverpool

Ladies Day is Ken Alexander’s first choice as the venue’s new artistic director – and he has certainly chosen well.

Written by Amanda Whittington in 1995, this play was slightly tweaked for its Liverpool debut, and instead of a Ladies Day at Ascot, we find ourselves transported to Aintree for this wonderful piece of comedy.

With big hats, designer dresses and a sizeable bet, will this day change their lives forever?

The age range of the characters in the Kirkby fish factory where the action begins differs vastly – along with their marital status and home life – but there is a great camaraderie among them.

When Pearl announces her retirement is imminent it is a great excuse to have a celebration and what better way to celebrate than a day at the races.

Eithne Browne, a native of Liverpool and known for her many roles in both TV and on stage, as well as being the voice of the world famous Mersey Ferry, plays Pearl, the dark horse with a secret to be uncovered.

The leader of the pack is the sexy Shelly, always willing to show off her “assets” to get what she wants, but when given the chance to make financial gain from them, will she succumb?

Roxanne Pallett, best known from her role in Emmerdale, plays the beautiful Shelly, and gives a quality performance with a great singing voice too.

Single mum Jan, who has given up everything for her daughter’s wellbeing, harbours a secret crush on the boss of the fish factory and is encouraged by the friends to have a life for herself.

Will she take the plunge?

Lynn Francis plays Jan and is well known and loved by the Liverpool theatre-goers, often appearing in the local 
theatres as well as pantos.

Then we have Linda, youngest of the set and a bit simple with probably the worst home life.

Angela Simms plays Linda and this was her first time performing at the Royal Court, although she has had several years performing around the country and on the radio.

The six male parts are played by one man, Jack 
Lord.

He slips into each role so 
easily, it is a credit to his 
acting skills to be able to play a factory boss, a TV presenter, a jockey etc all in one play.

It’s a great pick-me-up and well worth a visit to the Royal Court.

Ellen Campbell