Families urged to get outdoors for Child Mental Health Week

Picture by Alison Threadgould
Picture by Alison Threadgould

Families with young children are being urged to get outdoors as part of Child Mental Health Week.

And those with mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are being actively encouraged to try eco-therapy and explore the environment as a way to support their recovery.

This innovative initiative, run by the Lancashire Wildlife Trust in collaboration with Lancashire and South Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust, aims to demonstrate that by getting involved in outdoor

activities, young people can reduce their stress levels, prevent mental health problems and improve their concentration and mood.

Terry Drake, lead nurse at Lancashire & South Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Myplace is a great project for young people to get involved in, by just getting outdoors it can have such a positive impact on both a person’s mental health and physical wellbeing.”

Based across green spaces, Myplace encourages both young people and adults to reconnect to nature. Activities can include bush craft, foraging, fire and cooking, nature walks, mindfulness,

growing food and cooking. People are able to choose their own tailored plan.

Mental health problems such as anxiety and depression affect around one in 10 young people, and are often a direct response to what is happening in their lives. With this in mind, young people are

being encouraged to participate in eco-therapy activities offered by MyPlace to help them improve their mental health.

Set up by children’s mental health charity, Place2Be, Children’s Mental Health Week (February 3-9) shines a spotlight on the importance of children and young people’s mental health.

For more information about the Myplace project visit www.lscft.nhs.uk/myplace or www.lancswt.org.uk/myplace-project or follow us on Twitter @myplace2gr0w.

You can find out more about Children’s Mental Health Week by visiting www.childrensmentalhealthweek.org.uk.