Cancer fund raising spearheaded by Goosnargh man raises more than £37,000

Kevin Poynton, Sam Viera, Jim Wilson, Chairman of the Lancaster and District Masonic Group, and Peter Pemberton.
Kevin Poynton, Sam Viera, Jim Wilson, Chairman of the Lancaster and District Masonic Group, and Peter Pemberton.

A prostate cancer research campaign spearheaded by a Goosnargh man has raised more than £37,000.

Peter Pemberton launched the campaign through Lancaster and District Freemasons after discovering a friend had been diagnosed with the disease in a bid to raise funds for research projects to find new treatments and also to raise awareness of the disease.

Peter explains: “Prostate Cancer has been a much under-publicised and under-funded disease despite it being the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in the UK.

“Prostate Cancer kills one man every 45 minutes in the UK and almost 50,000 men are diagnosed with the disease every year in this country alone”.

“Early diagnosis is crucial in offering the best opportunity of stemming the tide of men dying from the disease or from suffering significant quality of life impairment. This is the message that, through the campaign, I want to get across.”

All proceeds from the campaign are donated to Prostate Cancer UK, whose target is to tame prostate cancer by focussing attention on four priority areas: better diagnosis, better treatment, better prevention and better support.

The latest donation from the campaign of £5,000 - bringing the total donated to date to £37,500 - was presented to the charity at Wyrebank, Garstang, attended by Sam Viera of Prostate Cancer UK, Kevin Poynton, Assistant Provincial Grand Master for the Masonic Province of West Lancashire and members of the Lancaster and District Group of Masonic Lodges.

Sam said: “On behalf of all the team at Prostate Cancer UK I am extremely grateful for the support given by Freemasons generally, and particularly for this magnificent and generous donation from the amazing campaign by the Masons of Lancaster and District. It will greatly help in our work towards the eventual defeat of prostate disease.”