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Hospital team take to muddy fun run to raise funds for Garstang girl Phoebe Roskell

Phoebe Roskell with brother Woody.
Phoebe Roskell with brother Woody.
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Hospital staff are gearing up to take part in a 5km muddy run fun to raise money for Garstang girl Phoebe Roskell.

Fifteen members of staff from the Trauma and Orthopaedics department at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary are gearing up to take part in Pretty Muddy 5k Preston this coming Saturday to raise funds for five-year-old Phoebe.

Fifteen members of staff from the Trauma and Orthopaedics department at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary are gearing up to take part in Pretty Muddy 5k Preston on Saturday 16 June. Theyre all raising money for local five-year-old Phoebe Roskell, who has a very rare genetically inherited disorder called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC).

Fifteen members of staff from the Trauma and Orthopaedics department at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary are gearing up to take part in Pretty Muddy 5k Preston on Saturday 16 June. Theyre all raising money for local five-year-old Phoebe Roskell, who has a very rare genetically inherited disorder called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC).

Phoebe suffers from the very rare genetically inherited disorder called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC).

She is the neice of the department’s Trauma Coordinator Sara Lavis who will be taking part in the event with her team – who call themselves the Trauma Troopers.

Phoebe’s aunty Sara, Trauma Co-ordinator at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Foundation Trust (UHMBT), said: “I’m touched by the support of my colleagues, I’m inspired by Phoebe to do the best I can.

“This is a massive challenge for me but it is nothing in comparison to what Phoebe has had to go through and continues to go through on a daily basis.

“I feel this an opportunity to help and raise awareness.”

The money raised will go to DC Outreach (USA) which is the leader in the condition and offer support to families all over the world.

The Trauma Troopers are also raising money for Cancer Research UK and have raised over £500 so far.

Colleague Kerry Anderson, Trainee Advanced Clinical Practitioner, who will lead the Trauma Troopers, said: “We were so touched by the story of local girl Phoebe Roskell we decided to raise money for her.

Sue Smith, Executive Chief Nurse and Deputy Chief Executive at UHMBT, explained how DC is a condition “that can lead to bone marrow failure, lung fibrosis, liver cirrhosis and abnormalities of skin and nails, among other conditions”.